Previous Events 2014

 

Frederick Reads 2014 Facebook Cover Image

2014 FREDERICK READS

"The Music of Language"

From lullabies to hymns to pop songs, nothing unites us quite like music. A few words from a favorite song can cast us back in time to moments with our moms, our first love, or our high school homecoming game. A lyric can evoke certain places we’ve visited or people we’ve known. The words can lift us up when we’re sad or give voice to our anger. Songs can even define the values of an entire generation. So what better theme to unite our community in conversation than the “The Music of Language”? During its 2014 season from February through April, Frederick Reads has celebrated the melody wherever it appears—be it music or meme, poetry or tweet, novel or newspaper.

 

THE C. BURR ARTZ POETRY SERIES WELCOMED UNITED STATES POET LAUREATE NATASHA TRETHEWEY

"…it is poignancy, above all other qualities, that marks Trethewey's poetry. She is not often lyrical, not often a poet who will send your heart soaring on a startling image or dazzling metaphor, but she can stop you in your tracks with a quiet statement of the way things really are-or feel. With an eye for the earthly details that matter."

Arts in Atlanta

There is more poignancy in these words than bitterness, and it is poignancy, above all other qualities, that marks Trethewey’s poetry. She is not often lyrical, not often a poet who will send your heart soaring on a startling image or dazzling metaphor, but she can stop you in your tracks with a quiet statement of the ways things really are — or feel. With an eye for the earthly details that matter. - See more at: http://www.artsatl.com/2012/09/poet-laureate-natasha-tretheweys-thrall-examines-father-daughter-racial-divide/#sthash.T60BzU5b.dpuf
There is more poignancy in these words than bitterness, and it is poignancy, above all other qualities, that marks Trethewey’s poetry. She is not often lyrical, not often a poet who will send your heart soaring on a startling image or dazzling metaphor, but she can stop you in your tracks with a quiet statement of the ways things really are — or feel. With an eye for the earthly details that matter. - See more at: http://www.artsatl.com/2012/09/poet-laureate-natasha-tretheweys-thrall-examines-father-daughter-racial-divide/#sthash.T60BzU5b.dpuf
There is more poignancy in these words than bitterness, and it is poignancy, above all other qualities, that marks Trethewey’s poetry. She is not often lyrical, not often a poet who will send your heart soaring on a startling image or dazzling metaphor, but she can stop you in your tracks with a quiet statement of the ways things really are — or feel. With an eye for the earthly details that matter. - See more at: http://www.artsatl.com/2012/09/poet-laureate-natasha-tretheweys-thrall-examines-father-daughter-racial-divide/#sthash.T60BzU5b.dpuf

Natasha Trethewey, the nineteenth United States Poet Laureate (2012-2013) and authortrethewey2gb of several collections of poetry as well as a book ofnon-fiction,highlighted 2014’s C. Burr Artz Trust Poetry Series at the Weinberg Center for the Arts on Sunday, March 2. Trethewey is the author of ThrallNative Guard, for which shewon the 2007 Pulitzer Prize; Bellocq’s Ophelia, which was named a Notable Book for 2003 by the American Library Association; and Domestic Work. She is also the author of Beyond Katrina: A Meditation on the Mississippi Gulf Coast.

Trethewey, who took up her Poet Laureate duties in the fall of 2012, opened the Library of Congress' annual literary season with a reading of her work. Her first term coincided with the 75th anniversary of the Library's Poetry and Literature Center and the 1937 establishment of the Consultant-in-Poetry position, which was changed by a federal law in 1986 to Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry.

Trethewey is the current State Poet Laureate of Mississippi (2012-2016) and the Robert W. Woodruff Professor of English and Creative Writing at Emory University.

Read more about her appearance in Frederick here.

 

FREDERICK READS WELCOMES AMERICAN SINGER-SONGWRITER AND AUTHOR ROSANNE CASH

 “Cash’s beautifully observed, often heartbreaking new memoir Composed reads in many ways like a song cycle: thematically linked, full of intense emotions and vivid moments of intimacy, of discovery, of pain.”

—Philadelphia Inquirer 

 

Rosanne Cash photo credit Clay Patrick McBrideThere are few contemporary singer-songwriters who have enjoyed as much critical and commercial success as Rosanne Cash.  After thirty years as a performer she continues to release albums notable for their intelligence and risk taking, and for their richly resonant lyrics.  Not surprisingly, Cash is also an accomplished prose writer, and in her long-awaited memoir, Composed, she shares her memories of growing up as Johnny Cash’s eldest child and coming into her own as a performer, daughter, and mother. Composed is an unforgettable self-portrait written with intelligence, compassion, humor, warmth and truth showcasing her unflinching strengths, remarkable talents, and incredible professional and personal growth.

Cash was in Frederick for a series of appearances and book signings, reaching diverse audiences of all ages. She kicked off her two day visit to Frederick with a concert with husband and collaborator, John Leventhal, at the Weinberg Center for the Arts on Monday, March 31st. Following the performance, a ticketed meet-and-greet reception was held on the Weinberg stage.

On Tuesday, April 1st Cash hosted discussions of her work followed by question-and-answer sessions with the audience and a book signing at Frederick Community College. Later that evening Cash returned to the Weinberg for an interview with David Dye, host of NPR’s World Cafe®, and was also interviewed by writer Jason Tinney.

Both events were free and open to the public.

Enjoy The Frederick Reads Youtube Channel, featuring Rosanne Cash's appearance for Frederick Reads.